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These manuals will walk you through the BoXZY experience, from the first un-boxing to using your device for the first time. Please follow each numbered manual in sequence so that you don't miss any crucial information. After you complete 1.3 Using Your BoXZY, you'll be able to move on to the 3D Printing, Laser Engraving, and CNC Milling manuals.

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Making enclosure panels for CNC milling and heating 3d printer chamber

Hi,

I am trying to make some walls for my boxzy. Seeing the team doesn't have the resources to ship out theirs (i backed a "supreme" machine) is it possible to get design specs and mounting suggestions for what was originally planned? Any information that I can get would help me make a neater solution and I can make a guide to help other people do the same.

I think the original plan was to attach them with magnets?

Thanks in advance.

Maz

Answered! View the answer I have this problem too

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Read through the posts here for plans and appropriate STL files and solidworks models.

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After I used the dremel to cut around the brackets that are used to secure the ball screws and guide rods, the panels can sit flush against the outside wall of the printer. After talking to the boxzy team, I decided not to use magnets to mount them. Mostly because it would mean heavily modifying the machine and most other people wouldn't be able to use the designs. Instead I've opted to make the panels rest on the bottom of each of the holes and then add some clips to hold the top of the panels against the printer... My descriptions are terrible but photos will follow.

So I was testing out glueing pieces of acrylic together using a slurry made of acrylic shavings dissolved in acetone until it had roughly the consistency of honey. If it dries out too much it goes more like snot except springy. So I made some L shaped hooks to stick to the bottoms of the panels (out of the way) so that they sit over the wall of the printer.

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I just held the panels in place, reached into the machine and traced along the bottom of the space giving me a line to work from.

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I cut away a small piece of the protecting plastic and applied my acetone-acrylic slurry and then clamped the piece in place. If i had properly prepared the parts and if I had use real acrylic cement, it should be possible to get a perfectly clear join. Unfortunately I was working with whatever scraps I had around the place so they had rough edges and aren't so clear. I'm going to add some M3 counter-sunk bolts to hold the hooks in place, but that's mostly because I don't trust my dodgy glue.

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The panels seem to be very secure in their positions, certainly enough to use the CNC without having to worry about scrap material filling my other electronics projects.

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The panels still have the protective coating on but once I can put those bolts through I'll peel that off and take a new picture. Hopefully they're very clear. If I was doing it again, I'd consider using a cnc to cut mounting points for the blocks, rather than using bolts.

The lid is going to be slightly more complicated. I would like to design a set of parts that are cnc cut to slot together (like the rest of the walls of the printer) but I don't have a cnc large enough to cut the pieces I'd like. Hopefully over the next month I'll make CAD files for the panels and the lid and other people can make their own.

Keeping in mind that I'm just using scrap acrylic (so my panels are for CNC waste collection and to heat the build area for ABS prints, it's not too bad.

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That's some great work. Thanks for sharing!

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What are your plans for collecting the cnc waste? Pick it up after the project finishes, or actively suck it up? I recently starting milling wood and the mess is considerable! I'm trying to figure out some bellows for the rods because boy oh boy do they get gummed up! Nice job with your upgrade :)

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I haven't got a router here yet (I sent the 110V one back to the boxzy team when I moved back to Australia where we have 240V power). I'm in the process of building a big cnc at the moment and it's going to need bellows and such to cover the ball screws but i'm designing it with that in mind. I don't know a good way of doing it with a boxzy unless you get some ball screw dust covers (round bellows), but you'd lose some travel distance on x+ and y+ I think. With the coreflute lid on mine, it would be possible to add a vacuum hose and route it through back. I planned active cleaning for the big cnc but i have a lot larger build area to play with.

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Here's how I did it:

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I 3d printed the stands and attached them under the lip of the boxzy. Panels on the 3 side openings.

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Are you just using this for laser shielding? I'm trying to create an enclosure that will let me heat the space enough to print ABS and nylon so I'm going to have to enclose the top . Are there gaps around your side panels where the 3d print sits between the panels and the Boxzy?

Thanks for your reply. It's a great solution that I hadn't thought of.

Maz

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There's a gap. I sized it so that it would accommodate the aluminum settings for the ball screws (those shiny ovals). You could easily fill in the gaps though with some adhesive cork or the felt used at the bottoms of doors to prevent drafts. I think it's a workable design :)

Glad you liked it!

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Thanks. I might give it a try with a piece of cork to fill the gap. Can you share the sldprt file (or whatever you're using) for the stand? Otherwise I can make some from scratch.

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So I have a good plan.

First, here is my temporary enclosure that works for now ..

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The top is 300mm * 450mm * 200mm made of corflute and I'll probably use that one as the permanent lid, maybe with better joins.

So the permanent sides are going to be 280mm x 300mm, and I'm going to use a dremel to cut them in around the mounts for the ball screws that are on the outside.

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The tricky part is mounting it. The current plan is to use an end mill to cut a 2mm deep, 10mm diameter hole into the 13mm wide strips of acrylic and set neodynium magnets into those strips. Then I plan to drill through the top of the sides and tap the holes (drilling right through so i can tap from the outside) and then from the inside, screw through the acrylic strips into those threaded holes. That will hold the 3 magnets per side in place just on the other side of the aluminium. It appears that there is enough space for 13mm * 10mm stips of acrylic on the inside of the machine so if I an unable to mill into the strips as they are, I will attach a second piece behind them.

The panels will each have 3 matching magnets along the top and i'll glue more strips of acrylic to rest on the inside of the cutouts at the bottom. Of course I'll take more photos as I continue but if anyone else wanted to start, this gives them the opportunity to point out mistakes in my plan or start purchasing materials.

Maz

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Will there be gaps on the left and right side of the panels, or will those be filled in too? Sounds like a cool project!

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From what I remember, they were the full size of the sides and front with cutouts for the heads of the bolts and the aluminum brackets. They sat flush on the outside of the body and covered everything but where the small cutouts were. The one I saw looked like it was tight over the bolts, maybe a light press fit to the bolt heads. I don't know where there were magnets.

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I was just having a look and basically, the team have done a really good job at wasting no space. Which just means that it's very hard to find a way to mount sides on the Boxzy without interfering with the workings of the machine. Also, because the whole thing is made with aluminium (aluminum), I can't find anything that magnets would stick to except for the ball screws, and for obvious reasons that is a bad place to stick a magnet.

I've got a few sheets of corflute that I can use to test out mounting ideas and then I'm going to build proper walls with 5mm acrylic sheeting. That should be adequate for my needs. I was wondering if I attached some permanent magnets to the outside of the machine with epoxy and then recessed some into my walls, if it would be possible to use these for mounting. Makes me wish I had some thinner / lighter acrylic. The corflute should work well tho.

I'm open to suggestions before I start building, and I'm surprised that I havent seen anyone else's attempt at the same. There was a blog post about putting an enclosure with a fume hood over the entire machine but as I'm just trying to warm it up inside to 3d print ABS and nylon, I'd rather make side panels.

Thanks for your suggestions already.

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So I have a plan for latching the panels and a few changes that I'd make if i was doing them again. Right now I'm going to do some drawings / diagrams for what I did and post those online.

As I said in a previous post, I changed my focus to being something that is simple for a normal user to do (doesn't require drilling lots of holes in the printer itself) and inexpensive.

Panel latch:

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Mounts on 6mm OD, 7mm long spacer with a 20mm OD M5 washer to stop the latch slipping off.

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So I had to purchase:

2x M4 20mm

2x M5 16mm

1x M5 20mm

5x M5 20mm OD washers

Acrylic sheet (I used 5mm thick clear but you can use anything with relatively minor adjustments to the plan.)

a piece of brass pipe with an ID of at least 5.2mm and OD of 6mm. (Again, this could be almost anything between 6mm and 10mm but you'd need to adjust the latch print with a bigger OD)

To use, simply spin so they overlap the panel or not.

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Don't mind the blue tape. I was being impatient with getting it off the print bed.

- Maz

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And now for the thrilling "almost" conclusion..

I've done the CAD for 2 of the panels which means if you have a bigger CNC you can just cut those out. I also made a plug for my thermister connector and took a few more photos, but with the protective plastic removed from the panels now. Unfortunately, this just makes it very obvious that I need more practice using acetone to glue acrylic if I want it to look good. Without further ado...

The current final product:

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I'll include some better pictures of the previous parts I did as well.

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Updated STL for the latch: http://maz.net.au/Files/Public/3dPrinter... (I'm printing mine of these right now so I haven't tested them yet.)

Because I have the heated bed, and I want to be able to remove not only the bed inside by unplugging it (so I can cnc) but also remove the box from the outside, I found some double ended plugs and 3d printed a holder for it that fits into the 12mm hole I drilled into the side.

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STL for my plug: http://maz.net.au/Files/Public/3dPrinter...

I haven't installed it yet but it should work quite well. The thermister is low voltage and low current so the small plug should be sufficient (I'll find out soon enough if it's not) and for the actual mains power for the heater I've used C8 plugs with a short cable and another plug inside the machine.

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Black-2-...

Here are my notes for the panel parts as well.

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edit: I just realised that the edge of the notes page was cut off.

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Lessons learned:

1) Use acrylic cement / adhesive. It's cheap enough once you find it and gives a clearer finish unless you have a lot of practice using acetone. Alternatively, Use 16mm counter-sunk screws, tapped into the acrylic to give a nice looking finish.

2) I'd put little blocks in the corners of each of the panels as guide pins so that the panel slid into place more easily and are held in position securely.

3) The side panels should probably have 2 hooks each. I was just being lazy.

4) The sizes of most of my parts were somewhat arbitrary (based on the size of scrap material I had laying around). The hooks would only need to be 25mm wide, especially if you had 2 on each of the sides.

5) Because I was cutting them by hand with a hacksaw, the brass standoffs I have are different lengths. If I could be consistent with these, the latches would hold on better. My panels themselves were cut by hand and are 2mm out in some places leaving small gaps.

6) A dremel makes very short work of acrylic (and a huge mess of my workshop). Next time I'll use a cnc.

7) I should have used laser blocking acrylic to start with. Unfortunately I didn't have any so I used 5mm thick clear. There is no reason that 3mm couldn't have been used, I just didn't have enough lying around.

8) Mid-way through the project, I changed the plans entirely to be more easily manufacturable and require a lot less modification of the machine. It is possible to install the panels / restore the printer to it's stock configuration in about 15 minutes using only the hex wrenches included with the machine. Changing the requirements mid-way through the project wasted a bunch of time and left me with some (not too many) parts I didn't end up using.

Next steps: I plan to make a clear lid with interlocking acrylic panels (using 3mm this time) which should let enough light in that I can still see my 3d print. While I'm using the coreflute lid, I'm tempted to add a ring of LEDs around the printer nozzle to help me see the progress. I'll have to investigate what power is available and how much heat the LEDs will stand up to. Otherwise I'll put strips of lights in the lid and may have to power these externally.

That's it for now. I'm just checking if it's okay to post my CAD files for everything otherwise I think I'm done. Good luck everyone and hopefully this will be available as a kit soon.

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So I can't see any harm in posting the solidworks models of the side panels for you to make at home.

Disclaimer: I didn't CNC my panels off these models, so I can't say for sure that they're 100% accurate. I offer no such warranties.

Front panel

Right side panel

I haven't done the left side panel yet.

If you want to modify the latches to suit different diameter spacers, here is the model for those as well.

Latch v4

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Maz will be eternally grateful.
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