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This section contains questions and topics related to troubleshooting BoXZY's CNC milling head.

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Cutting Size larger than Easel Gcode

Hello, I’m very new to using a CNC Milling machine. I do what I thought was a simple cutting procedure. I mill the centers out of Silver Dollars. I created a tool path the size of the coin 38.1mm , this was to be used to create a pocket Jig to hold the coin for the milling procedure, more on that later. The path cuts fine, but ends up being 40mm+ when the milling is finished.

I’m using a 1/8” end mill supplied with the machine. While I could second guess and reduce the size of the path, I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong.

The actual size of the Jig is 50mm square, the cut for the center of the coin is 25.54mm. The other question is when I home the mill, do I do it from the edge of the jig or the edge where the coin will actually reside?

I’m sorry if this is a simple issue, but being new I just want to get this one procedure down pat. This is a wonderful machine, the cuts I have made attempting to make the jig are just wonderful. I was amazed at the finish of the wood after milling, it’s almost like a 600 grit finish on it with virtually no clean up.

Thank you for your valuable time.

Glenn Auer

MJJ Magic Mfg.

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I mistakenly added my answer as a comment and now I can’t find it. I feel like a real tool about now.

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No worries, I make that mistake all the time. It looks like it didn't post.

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Hi Glenn,

Thanks for reaching out. Are you sure your endmill is 1/8” and not 1/4”? 1/4” is the typical size provided with BoXZY. That could potentially be your issue.

Another possibility is run-out (out-of-roundness that increases cutting diameter). If you are using a collet reducer as opposed to a precision collet adapter, you likely have around 0.004" of run-out. You can resolve this by cutting a straight line forward and the same line backwards, then measure its width. Use that width as your diameter as opposed to the actual bit diameter. Reduce the size as necessary if the cut for the circle becomes to small. Once you have it dialed in, always use that as the diameter for that setup and endmill.

For homing, it's wherever you set it up to be. If you set your circle in the middle of a 50 mm square, with edges that fall exactly on the X and Y axis corner, homing 0 point will be for that 50mm square. In other words, it's where you set your shape on the Easel grid that determines it. The X and Y intersection at 0 on Easels's grid is your 0 point of the X and Y axis relative to where you place your shape within that same grid.

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Please see below Thanks!

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Well you were right, the bit is a 1/4”. I fixed that in the Easel settings. I also found out by flipping the Easel home to upper left hand corner causes the Gcode to load and display properly in the Boxzy interface. With that said the creation of the jig is perfect.

Using the same template in Easel for the jig, I want in and created 3 1” circles that I want to use to cut the coins with so the centers fall out, leaving the the dollar coin with a 1” hole in the center. I made the necessary circles, centered them to the circles I used to make the pockets and then deleted the pocket circles so only the path to create the hole would cut. I tried using follow path setting and the it way off, I mean off the coin. I went back and set all the path circles to inside cut. That made it a bit better but still getting slightly off center and very odd patterns, not a perfect circle.

I basically just want to cut a path so the center of the dollar I’m milling just drops outs leaving a 1” hole in the coin. The team at Boxzy told me this would be perfect for what I need, so I know it has to be capable of just cutting a path to do so. I plan on using small mills on the silver coins so as to save the silver and waste as little as possible when cutting the path to make the hole. I know it’s not the Boxzy, and it has to be something I’m doing.

I’m trying to mill 2 different types of dollars, the old Ike dollars that are Nickel clad copper and 90% silver dollars. Needless to say, I haven’t tried the silver yet.

Thank you for your help and I just want to make holes in coins LOL.

Glenn Auer

MJJ Magic Mfg.

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Hi Glenn,

Could you post a video of the failure?

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I think I figured out a part of the issue, since the obverse image on the coin, I think I need to Z down on the Obverse head of the coin since it sits higher than part of the coin to avoid deflection. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. I'll do this tonight and post a video and picture of the coin.

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I figured out the homing and cutting issues. But still have some questions about cutting Nickel/Copper and silver coins. Should I start another thread?

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Yeah, that would be easiest.

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Glenn Auer will be eternally grateful.
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