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Introduction

The default feedrate, depth per pass, and stepover for the material you choose will be very conservative when used in BoXZY. We believe this is a positive attribute for a beginner, you should leave them at their defaults.

  1. Go to Easel.com and select Sign in through Inventables, as shown in the first image. Sign Up for a new account by selecting I am a new  customer, as indicated by the red arrow in the image. Enter your information before selecting Continue. After signing up or signing in, you have the option to continue a project or create a new one. Select Start a new project, as indicated by the red box in the third image.
    • Go to Easel.com and select Sign in through Inventables, as shown in the first image.

    • Sign Up for a new account by selecting I am a new customer, as indicated by the red arrow in the image. Enter your information before selecting Continue.

    • After signing up or signing in, you have the option to continue a project or create a new one. Select Start a new project, as indicated by the red box in the third image.

  2. Select mm from the bottom of the Easel main screen to set the project units in millimeters, as indicated by the red arrow in the first image. Next, edit the values in the X and Y Material Dimensions box, as indicated by the red box in the second image, and set them to 165mm. Set the Z dimension as the thickness of your material using the Material Dimensions box, shown in yellow in the second image.
    • Select mm from the bottom of the Easel main screen to set the project units in millimeters, as indicated by the red arrow in the first image.

    • Next, edit the values in the X and Y Material Dimensions box, as indicated by the red box in the second image, and set them to 165mm.

    • Set the Z dimension as the thickness of your material using the Material Dimensions box, shown in yellow in the second image.

    • Next, set your material type by selecting the Material tab, as indicated by the purple square in the third image. Then, select the material type your preview will display.

  3. You can import an SVG file to convert to G-code by selecting Import, then SVG, as indicated by the red arrows in the first picture.  Then, select the SVG file you want to import. You can also create shapes like squares, circles, triangles, and stars, as well as write text and import Easel icons, as shown by the red boxes in the second image. Select the Circle and draw a circle using your mouse. You will then see a new tool open up, as indicated by the green box in the third image. This is the Depth of Cut tool. It allows you to set how deep you mill into your material.
    • You can import an SVG file to convert to G-code by selecting Import, then SVG, as indicated by the red arrows in the first picture. Then, select the SVG file you want to import.

    • You can also create shapes like squares, circles, triangles, and stars, as well as write text and import Easel icons, as shown by the red boxes in the second image.

    • Select the Circle and draw a circle using your mouse. You will then see a new tool open up, as indicated by the green box in the third image. This is the Depth of Cut tool. It allows you to set how deep you mill into your material.

    • You can determine the dimension by sliding the bar or entering it manually at the bottom of the Depth of Cut tool.

    • Note: if you wish to cut through your material all the way, measure and set your depth of cut to be no more than 0.5 mm so that you can get the most out of your sacrificial board.

    • You can select where you'll cut relative to the shape, as indicated by the orange box in the third image. You can cut On the Path, Outside of it, Inside of it, Outline it or Fill the entire area.

  4. Next, you have the option to create tabs. Tabs are used to secure your cut-out part to the material. After the file is complete, you will have to cut the tabs to free the part from the material. The blue arrows in the first image point out tabs in the file preview. In the Tab menu, shown in the blue box in the first image, you can set the number of tabs, their width , and their thickness to your liking. Next, select your Bit Size with the Bit Size menu, as indicated by the red box in the second image.
    • Next, you have the option to create tabs. Tabs are used to secure your cut-out part to the material. After the file is complete, you will have to cut the tabs to free the part from the material. The blue arrows in the first image point out tabs in the file preview.

    • In the Tab menu, shown in the blue box in the first image, you can set the number of tabs, their width , and their thickness to your liking.

    • Next, select your Bit Size with the Bit Size menu, as indicated by the red box in the second image.

    • In the Bit Size menu, you can select from commonly used bits, as indicated by the blue box in the second image.

    • You may also enter the Bit Diameter manually by selecting Other and typing in the value, as indicated by the purple box in the second image.

    • To view your toolpath(s), select Show Toolpath as indicated by the red box in the third image. You'll see a graphical representation of the G-code for your toolpath in the preview window, as indicated by the yellow box in the third image. The toolpath describes the motion of the bit.

  5. Rename your file by selecting the Untitled file name, as indicated by the red square in the first image. Type in your new project title and select Rename, as indicated by the red arrows in the image. Next, select your shape or SVG import file and then select Machine, as indicated by the blue box in the second image. Select Advanced from the Machine Menu, as indicated by the blue arrow in the second image.
    • Rename your file by selecting the Untitled file name, as indicated by the red square in the first image. Type in your new project title and select Rename, as indicated by the red arrows in the image.

    • Next, select your shape or SVG import file and then select Machine, as indicated by the blue box in the second image.

    • Select Advanced from the Machine Menu, as indicated by the blue arrow in the second image.

    • After selecting Advanced, a new window will open where you will see your Safety Height and Step Over %, indicated by the blue box in the third image.

    • Safety Height is the retraction height of the bit when it moves between the toolpaths. You can adjust this to avoid clamps or differences in material height.

    • Step Over % is the percentage of the bit diameter that actually cuts the material. The smaller this value is, the less material you cut with each pass. This is used primarily in the Fill cut of a toolpath. You should leave this at its default.

    • Select Generate G-Code, as indicated by the red box in the third image. The G-Code will begin to process.

    • The Export G-Code button will reveal itself after you select Generate G-Code, as indicated by the red arrow in the third image. Select it and a Save window will open. Save your file. It will be sent to your web browser download folder.

  6. Move the G-code file you just created in Easel from your download folder to your BoXZY Folder. Open the BoXZY Interface and select Load, as indicated by the red box in the image. Select your file and select Open, as indicated by the red arrow and blue box in the first image. View your G-code in the interface by selecting Edit G-Code, as indicated by the red box in the second image.
    • Move the G-code file you just created in Easel from your download folder to your BoXZY Folder.

    • Open the BoXZY Interface and select Load, as indicated by the red box in the image. Select your file and select Open, as indicated by the red arrow and blue box in the first image.

    • View your G-code in the interface by selecting Edit G-Code, as indicated by the red box in the second image.

    • Your new G-code will appear in the G-code window, as shown by the red box in the third image.

    • Now you have created G-code with Easel! You're ready to set up BoXZY to mill your file.

  7. Easel has a lot of great features to help you create G-code and the milling toolpaths.
Finish Line

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BoXZY

Member since: 04/12/2016

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If you have any questions please post them here:

http://boxzy.dozuki.com/Answers

This is so the team or other users can provide responses. Comments are not commonly reviewed by the team.

Badley Bratt - Reply

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